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Pediatric Aortic Coarctation

Key points about coarctation of the aorta (COA) in children

  • COA is a congenital heart defect. It means the aorta is narrower than it should be.
  • Symptoms can vary from mild to more severe. They may include trouble breathing, poor weight gain, poor feeding and pale skin.
  • If not treated, it can lead to coronary artery disease, kidneys not working well, high blood pressure in the upper body and low blood pressure in the lower body, and even death.
  • COA can be fixed by cardiac catheterization or surgery.
  • After surgery, most children live healthy lives. But regular follow-up care is needed.

Prevention and Risk Assessment

Diagnosis

Treatment

Departments

Departments

Prenatal Cardiology Program

Our heart care begins before babies are even born, in our dedicated Prenatal Cardiology Program, where we diagnose and even treat prenatal heart conditions.

Children's National Heart Institute

Our expert pediatric heart team, including more than 40 subspecialties, offer advanced heart care and excellent outcomes for thousands of children every year.

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Share your birthday with a child. Celebrate your life, and give a chance to someone who desperately wants to have as many as you.

Share your birthday with a child. Celebrate your life, and give a chance to someone who desperately wants to have as many as you. Make it happen

Teresa's Story

Teresa Dejesus

Teresa, age 2, was diagnosed with cardiomyopathy and waited on the Berlin Heart EXCOR® Pediatric Ventricular Assist Device (VAD) for nine months while she waited for a heart transplant. Her heart arrived on Christmas Day.

Read More of Teresa's Story