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Shriprasad Deshpande, M.B.B.S., M.S., joins Children’s National as Director of Advanced Cardiac Therapies and Heart Transplant Program

December 05, 2018
Dr. Shri Deshpande
WASHINGTONShriprasad Deshpande, M.B.B.S., M.S., a pediatric cardiologist, joins Children’s National Health System as the director of the advanced cardiac therapies and heart transplant program. 
 
Dr. Deshpande, an intensivist and heart failure and transplant cardiologist, will work within the Children's National Heart Institute (the Division of Cardiology and the Division of Cardiac Intensive Care) to guide the diagnosis and treatment of pediatric heart failure. He will also work with researchers, surgeons and engineers to accelerate the field of biomedical research and make it easy for patients to receive advanced therapies, such as mechanical pumps to support circulation, and, if necessary, heart transplant. 
 
“Subspecializing in personalized care is critical for all patients right now, not just adults,” says Dr. Deshpande. “This is one of the reasons I’m looking forward to working with Children’s National, a leader in the many subdivisions of pediatric medicine and research. 
 
“Our priority is to recognize the special needs of infants and children as they relate to heart failure,” he adds. “We want to provide the best care and advance science at the same time.” 
 
As an example, a grant from the National Institutes of Health enabled Dr. Deshpande to test ventricular assist devices for infants. Through another NIH grant, he analyzed the safety of organ transplants by testing a donor’s DNA, instead of conducting invasive biopsies in children.  
 
“The field of cardiology is in a unique position now to take advantage of discoveries happening in science, technology and engineering,” says Dr. Deshpande. “In addition to thinking about the logistics of heart transplants, we’re thinking about how we can delay the need for a heart transplant, understand how to grow tissue better and utilize technology to improve these outcomes. We’re investing in a child’s quality of life.” 
 
As the medical director of Mechanical Circulatory Support Program at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, Dr. Deshpande led the mechanical circulatory support program and created a subspecialty clinic to provide treatment for pediatric heart failure patients. He started the Muscular Dystrophy Cardiomyopathy clinic, which analyzes and treats cardiovascular comorbidities associated with muscular dystrophy. While he was an assistant professor of pediatrics at Emory University School of Medicine, he created a curriculum for pediatric cardiologists and for nurses training in the cardiac intensive critical care unit. 
 
Dr. Deshpande has published more than 70 studies and abstracts and will oversee clinical practice models, subspecialty clinics and academic research efforts at Children’s. His current research portfolio, inclusive of grants from the NIH and other funding agencies, is robust and varied: He’s studying how to improve mechanical support for complex heart disease patients, how to improve the performance of current pumps and how to develop new algorithms for these devices. Improving the diagnosis of transplant rejection, using technology to improve compliance and using new technologies to diagnose rejection, without invasive biopsies, are his other research interests. 

Dr. Deshpande serves as the chair of the scientific committee at the nonprofit Enduring Hearts and is on the American Heart Association’s Strategically Focused Research Network committee.

Media contact:
 Jessica Frost | 301-828-7521| 202-476-4500 

About Children's National Health System

Children’s National Health System, based in Washington, D.C., has served the nation’s children since 1870. Children’s National is one of the nation’s Top 5 pediatric hospitals and, for a second straight year, is ranked No. 1 in newborn care, as well as ranked in all specialties evaluated by U.S. News & World Report. It has been designated two times as a Magnet® hospital, a designation given to hospitals that demonstrate the highest standards of nursing and patient care delivery. This pediatric academic health system offers expert care through a convenient, community-based primary care network and specialty outpatient centers in the D.C. Metropolitan area, including the Maryland suburbs and Northern Virginia. Home to the Children’s Research Institute and the Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation, Children’s National is the seventh-highest NIH-funded pediatric institution in the nation. Children’s National is recognized for its expertise and innovation in pediatric care and as a strong voice for children through advocacy at the local, regional and national levels.

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