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  • Portrait of Young Girl Patient in Exam Room

    Leader in Care

    Throughout the Washington,D.C, region, the nation and the world, Children's National Health System is recognized for our expertise and innovation in pediatric care and as an advocate for all children.

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Latest News

Sequential imaging of Zika-exposed fetuses reveals most have normal brain development

Ultrasound (US) imaging performed during pregnancy and after childbirth revealed most Zika-related brain abnormalities experienced by infants exposed to the Zika virus during pregnancy, according to a prospective cohort study published online Nov. 26, 2018, in JAMA Pediatrics. Some Zika-exposed infants whose imaging had been normal during pregnancy had mild brain abnormalities detected by US and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after they were born.

Craig Sable, M.D., receives the American Heart Association’s Cardiovascular Disease in the Young (CVDY) 2018 Meritorious Achievement Award

Craig Sable, M.D., associate chief of the division of cardiology and director of echocardiography at Children’s National Health System, earned a lifetime achievement award, formally known as the 2018 Cardiovascular Disease in the Young (CVDY) Meritorious Achievement Award, on Nov. 10 at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2018. 

Resiliency in NICU parents may be linked to lower depression and anxiety

Parents of vulnerable newborns in neonatal intensive care units who feel less resilient may experience more symptoms of psychological distress, including depression and anxiety. A snapshot from an ongoing cross-sectional study exploring this relationship was presented during the American Academy of Pediatrics National Conference & Exhibition.

Kids’ firearm-related injuries differ: Younger kids are more likely to be injured accidentally

The reasons that children with firearm-related injuries are rushed to the nation’s emergency departments differs by the intent of the person discharging the weapon, with younger kids more likely to be injured by accident and older youths more likely to be victims of an assault, according to retrospective, cross-sectional analyses presented during the American Academy of Pediatrics National Conference & Exhibition. Efforts to protect children from firearm-related injuries should factor in these differences in intent as legislation and policies are drafted, suggests a study team led by Children’s National Health System.