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Cancer

Discover the conditions we treat and treatments we provide at Children's National Hospital. Providers at Children's National work with you and your family to decide on the best care plan for your child. Learn more about the Pediatric Cancer Program

Cancer Surgery

Our expert surgical oncology team provides the full spectrum of surgical treatment for children with cancer.

Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy is the use of anticancer drugs to treat cancer cells. Learn more about this treatment.

Pain Management

When a child has cancer, one of his or her greatest fears, and the fear of parents, is pain. Pain is a sensation of discomfort, distress or agony. Because pain is unique to each individual, a child's pain cannot be measured with a lab test or imaging study. Learn more about how we manage a child's pain at Children's National.

Sarcoma Treatment

Children’s National has advanced imaging equipment available for diagnosis, staging, treatment and follow-up for all bone and soft tissue sarcomas in children, adolescents and young adults. Learn more about this treatment.

Radiation

Radiation therapy (also called radiation oncology) uses special kinds of energy waves or particles to fight cancer. Learn more about this treatment.

Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL)

Cancer specialists at Children’s National in Washington, D.C., provide expert treatment for children who have acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Learn more about this condition, including its symptoms, what causes and how we treat it.

Bone Tumors

Children’s National Health System has a team of individuals who are highly skilled and experienced in the treatment of bone tumors, including osteosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma.

Brain Tumors

Brain tumors are the most common solid tumors in children.

Germ Cell Tumors

Germ cell tumors are malignant (cancerous) or nonmalignant (benign, noncancerous) tumors that are comprised mostly of germ cells.

Leukemia

Leukemia is the most common form of pediatric cancer. It affects approximately 3,250 children each year in the US, accounting for about 30 percent of childhood cancers. It can occur at any age, although it is most commonly seen in children between 2 and 6 years of age.