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Ear, Nose and Throat

Discover the conditions we treat and treatments we provide at Children's National Hospital. Providers at Children's National work with you and your family to decide on the best care plan for your child. Learn more about the Division of Otolaryngology.

Adenoid and Tonsil Hypertrophy

Enlarged adenoids may cause nasal obstruction, recurrent sinusitis, post nasal drip, sleep apnea, chronic runny nose, halitosis and even chronic cough. Large tonsils may cause sleep apnea at night and difficulty with swallowing during the day.

Age-Appropriate Hearing Milestones

Hearing problems may be suspected in children who are not responding to sounds or who are not developing their language skills appropriately. The following are some age-related guidelines that may help to decide if your child is having hearing problems.

Age-Appropriate Speech and Language Milestones

Hearing problems may be suspected in children who are not responding to sounds or who are not developing their language skills appropriately. Read about age-appropriate speech and language milestones for children.

boy in field with flowers

Allergic Rhinitis

Allergic rhinitis is a reaction that happens in the eyes, nose and throat. It occurs when allergens in the air trigger the release of histamine in the body. Learn more about this condition.

Aspiration

Aspiration is when something enters the airway or lungs by accident. Learn more about aspiration in children.

Branchial Cleft Abnormalities

A branchial cleft abnormality is a cluster of abnormally formed tissue in the neck. Learn more about this condition.

Bronchomalacia

Bronchomalacia is a congenital problem that arises from diminished cartilage support of the smaller airways. The weakened cartilage usually collapses more easily during expiration and causes trapping of secretions.

Cochlear Implant Surgery

Cochlear implant surgery involves making a small incision behind the ear and drilling away a portion of the temporal bone. The device is placed underneath the scalp, and an electrode is threaded into the cochlea through a permanent hole called a cochleostomy. The device is activated following surgical recovery, typically within a few weeks.