Skip to main content Skip to navigation
We care about your privacy. Read about your rights and how we protect your data. Get Details

Coronavirus Update: What patients and families need to know

The Children's National Research Institute

Research Profile

Education & Training

  • Pediatric Endocrinology Fellowship, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA (2008-2011)
  • M.M.Sc., Clinical Investigation, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (2009-2011)
  • Boston Combined Residency in Pediatrics, Boston, MA (2004-2008)
  • M.D., Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (2000-2004)
  • B.A., Religion, Columbia University, New York, NY (1996-2000)

Biography

Dr. Dauber is currently the Chief of Endocrinology at Children’s National Hospital. Dr. Dauber earned his M.D. and a Master’s degree in clinical investigation at Harvard Medical School. He completed his pediatrics residency, chief residency, and pediatric endocrinology fellowship training at Boston Children’s Hospital. 

At Boston Children’s Hospital, Dr. Dauber began his research career in the laboratory of Joel Hirschhorn. Dr. Dauber’s work focuses on rare genetic causes of growth disorders and the use of next generation sequencing technologies to understand pediatric endocrine disorders. He has identified numerous genetic etiologies for short stature including mutations in the ACAN and PAPPA2 gene. He has led targeted therapeutic trials in patients with rare genetic growth disorders. Additionally, Dr. Dauber discovered that mutations in imprinted geneds MKRN3  and DLK1 are responsible for central precocious puberty. After his time in Boston, Dr. Dauber was the inaugural Program Director of The Cincinnati Center for Growth Disorders at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital. 

In acknowledgment of his work, Dr. Dauber has earned multiple awards including young investigator awards from the Endocrine Society, the American Society of Clinical Investigation, and the European Society of Pediatric Endocrinology. Dr. Dauber is currently working on integrating data from the electronic health records with genomics to identify patients with undiagnosed genetic growth conditions.  

 

Research & Publications