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Coronavirus Update:What patients and families need to know

A New Hope: Preventing Bias in Personal, Professional and Patient Encounters

For Providers
Thursday, January 14, 2021

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

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Kenyon M. Railey, M.D., presents this topic in the Enrichment Lecture Series hosted by the Center for Translational Research at Children's National Hospital.

Email us to register for this event.This Enrichment Series webinar hosted by the Center of Translational Research, will feature Kenyon M. Railey, M.D., as our guest lecturer.Kenyon Michael Railey, M.D., currently serves as assistant professor in the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health in the Duke School of Medicine as well as medical director of the Duke Physician Assistant Program. He has served as assistant chief diversity officer in the Duke School of Medicine Office of Diversity & Inclusion since 2013 and is also the director of Diversity & Inclusion for the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health.  In addition to above, he is the founding Course Director of the Cultural Determinants of Health and Health Disparities (CDHD) course in the Duke School of Medicine. This course began in 2017 and is notably the first ever required longitudinal curriculum in the School of Medicine for MD and DPT students focused on health disparities and the sociocultural influences on health and well-being. His interests include minority health, graduate medical education, interprofessional collaboration initiatives and cultural humility instruction/program development.Objectives:Define culture, cultural competency/humility, structural competency and critical consciousness and discuss how these are relevant within academic medicine environments.Review the relationships between cultural attitudes, bias and stereotypes while examining how these impact personal and professional encounters.Recognize how bias could potentially contribute to health disparities and develop personal strategies to achieve cultural humility in human interactions while improving the perceived quality of care.Explore tools to perform self-reflection and ultimately combat bias.For questions about this lecture or registration information, please contact us. false DD/MM/YYYY

Email us to register for this event.

This Enrichment Series webinar hosted by the Center of Translational Research, will feature Kenyon M. Railey, M.D., as our guest lecturer.

Kenyon Michael Railey, M.D., currently serves as assistant professor in the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health in the Duke School of Medicine as well as medical director of the Duke Physician Assistant Program. He has served as assistant chief diversity officer in the Duke School of Medicine Office of Diversity & Inclusion since 2013 and is also the director of Diversity & Inclusion for the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health.  

In addition to above, he is the founding Course Director of the Cultural Determinants of Health and Health Disparities (CDHD) course in the Duke School of Medicine. This course began in 2017 and is notably the first ever required longitudinal curriculum in the School of Medicine for MD and DPT students focused on health disparities and the sociocultural influences on health and well-being.

His interests include minority health, graduate medical education, interprofessional collaboration initiatives and cultural humility instruction/program development.

Objectives:

  • Define culture, cultural competency/humility, structural competency and critical consciousness and discuss how these are relevant within academic medicine environments.
  • Review the relationships between cultural attitudes, bias and stereotypes while examining how these impact personal and professional encounters.
  • Recognize how bias could potentially contribute to health disparities and develop personal strategies to achieve cultural humility in human interactions while improving the perceived quality of care.
  • Explore tools to perform self-reflection and ultimately combat bias.

For questions about this lecture or registration information, please contact us.