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    Leader in Care

    Throughout the Washington, DC, region, the nation and the world, Children’s National Health System is recognized for our expertise and innovation in pediatric care and as an advocate for all children.

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    Leader in research

    Our desire to provide the most compassionate clinical care is complemented by our dedication to improving treatments and the quality of life for patients and their families.

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    Several specially trained people dedicated to children’s medicine care for your child, working together to give your family the best possible treatment.

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Latest News

Advanced MRI Can Detect Placental Perfusion Abnormalities in Pregnancies Complicated by Fetal CHD

In pregnancies complicated by fetal congenital heart disease, global placental perfusion was significantly decreased and regional variation of placental perfusion significantly increased as pregnancies progressed, findings that point to non-invasive imaging providing an early warning of placental dysfunction. A Children’s National Health System research team is thought to be the first to report non-invasive, whole placenta perfusion imaging in utero in a study published online Nov. 23, 2017 in Scientific Reports.

Girls' Social Camouflage Skills May Delay or Prevent Autism Diagnosis

On parent-reporting measures, girls with autism seem to struggle more than boys with performing routine tasks like getting up and dressed or making small talk, even when the study group is normalized to meet similar basic clinical diagnostic criteria across sexes.

Novel fMRI applications in childhood epilepsy increase understanding of seizure impacts on a child’s brain

Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has allowed researchers to map the memory functions that are often impaired within the brains of children with epilepsy. Additionally, a separate study of a novel application of resting-state fMRI, where the patient does not have to complete tasks, demonstrated the potential for clinicians to use non-invasive fMRI for language assessment for children who are too young or impaired to follow task directions in traditional fMRI studies. Both studies were presented at the American Epilepsy Society Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., last week.