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Corporate Partner Spotlight: Monica Davy

Wednesday, August 24, 2022

In our monthly Corporate Partner Spotlight, we speak with corporate leaders about what inspires them to serve as advocates and ambassadors for children’s health.

This month, we spoke with Monica Davy. Monica is chief culture, diversity and inclusion officer at Vizient, a consulting firm servicing health systems nationwide. She works with members to implement and reinforce diversity, equity and inclusion programs in healthcare. She previously led diversity, employee equal opportunity and civil rights programs for the FDA, IRS and National Credit Union Association. Monica joined Children’s National Corporate Advisory Council in 2021 and leads the healthcare industry subgroup. Her son is a longtime Children’s National patient, and their family and friends frequently participate on Team Caleb in the annual Race for Every Child.

Why do you support Children’s National as a member of the Corporate Advisory Council?

My son, Caleb, was born in kidney failure and with cerebral palsy. He has been treated for several illnesses by specialists and nurses at Children’s National. He’s had more than 30 surgeries and has spent years on dialysis.
Because of Children’s National, families like mine have critical access to magnificent expertise when faced with complex medical situations, grave questions and lifesaving decisions. I am forever grateful that Children’s National has been there for my family for more than 21 years.

Children’s National is in the midst of its follow the leader campaign. What role can business leaders play in the success of this campaign and the hospital?

Business leaders can use their platform and voice to let their surrounding communities know that Children’s National is a critical resource for the community. They also can make charitable giving to Children’s National a priority. Healthy communities begin with healthy children. If families can find the care that they need for their children, then they can come to work and contribute to the success of their companies.

How can your expertise in diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) support the hospital?

We have known for decades that disparities exist for underrepresented or minoritized communities. Systemic barriers and biases within healthcare have a direct impact on health equity and quality of care for these communities.
By focusing on DEI, a hospital like Children’s National can identify and mitigate systemic barriers and biases. For instance, when the diversity of the medical team reflects the diversity of the community, the hospital is in a better position to identify health inequities and address the multiple social determinants of health.
With my 27 years in DEI, I can help both Children’s National and our underrepresented and minoritized communities achieve greater quality of care.

What lessons have you learned from your time partnering with the hospital? What’s the most rewarding part of working with Children’s National?

The most rewarding part of working with this team is learning about the amazing impact that the hospital has made on so many other families like mine. Children and families in need can find care at Children’s National. That is why philanthropy is so important. Most people will not know this value until the unexpected happens. It is heartwarming to know that Children’s National will be there for kids and families in our community.


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