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Fetal Medicine News

NICU video stream provides peace of mind for parents

In late May 2019, Children’s National neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) introduced NicViewTM, a camera system that enables parents to log in from any internet-enabled device to see their infants virtually when they are unable to visit the NICU in person.

Reducing variations in feeding practices and fortifying breast milk helps micro-preemies grow

Standardizing feeding practices, including the timing for fortifying breast milk and formula with essential elements like zinc and protein, improves growth trends for the tiniest preterm infants, according to Children’s research presented during the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) 2018 Scientific Symposium. The symposium is held in conjunction with the IHI National Forum on Quality Improvement in Health Care.

Sequential imaging of Zika-exposed fetuses reveals most have normal brain development

Ultrasound (US) imaging performed during pregnancy and after childbirth revealed most Zika-related brain abnormalities experienced by infants exposed to the Zika virus during pregnancy, according to a prospective cohort study published online Nov. 26, 2018, in JAMA Pediatrics. Some Zika-exposed infants whose imaging had been normal during pregnancy had mild brain abnormalities detected by US and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after they were born.

NIAID and Children's National partner to advance pediatric clinical research

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, and Children’s National Health System, a pediatric academic medical center in Washington, have launched a clinical research partnership devoted to treating and preventing allergic, immunologic and infectious diseases in children. An inaugural symposium will take place at Children’s National on Sept. 17, 2018, to highlight the partnership and discuss current and future directions for its research activities.

Advanced MRI Can Detect Placental Perfusion Abnormalities in Pregnancies Complicated by Fetal CHD

In pregnancies complicated by fetal congenital heart disease, global placental perfusion was significantly decreased and regional variation of placental perfusion significantly increased as pregnancies progressed, findings that point to non-invasive imaging providing an early warning of placental dysfunction. A Children’s National Health System research team is thought to be the first to report non-invasive, whole placenta perfusion imaging in utero in a study published online Nov. 23, 2017 in Scientific Reports.