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Locations

  • Main Hospital

    Washington, District of Columbia 20010
    1-888-884-BEAR (2327)

Education & Training

  • Fellowship Program, Anesthesiology, 1976
    Sunnybrook Medical Centre
  • Fellowship Program, Pediatric Anesthesiology, 1975
    Hospital for Sick Children-Toronto
  • Residency Program, Anesthesiology, 1974
    University Hospital
  • Residency Program, Anesthesiology, 1973
    Charing Cross Hospital
  • Residency Program, Anesthesiology, 1970
    Cairo University Hospitals
  • Internship Program, Rotating Internship, 1968
    Cairo University Hospitals
  • Residency Program, Anesthesiology, 1968
    Anglo American Hospital
  • MBBCH, 1967
    Cairo University

Board Certifications

  • Royal College of Surgeons

National Provider ID: 1205926755


Biography

Leila Welborn, M.D., is a pediatric anesthesiologist at Children's National Health System. She is the medical director of Children's Ambulatory Surgery Center in Montgomery County. Dr. Welborn has been practicing at Children’s National for more than thirty years.

Dr. Welborn is recognized as a leader in pediatric anesthesiology with expertise in a variety of specialized areas including education, management of premature infants, fluid management in pediatrics, and inhalational anesthetics for children. She has authored and coauthored numerous articles, book chapters, and abstracts. Dr. Welborn is also an invited lecturer, nationally and internationally. 

Comparison of emergence and recovery characteristics of sevoflurane desflurane and halothane in pediatric ambulatory patients

(1996) Anesthesia & Analgesia

Evaluation of awakening and recovery characteristics following anaesthesia with nitrous oxide and halothane fentanyl or both for brief outpatient procedures in infants

(1997) Paediatric Anaesthesia

Induction recovery and safety characteristics of sevoflurane in children undergoing ambulatory surgery A comparison with halothane

(1996) Anesthesiology