Otolaryngology Fellowship

Children's National Health System offers a one year pediatric otolaryngology fellowship program with training in all aspects of pediatric otolaryngology which will prepare the fellow for a career in academic medicine with an appointment as a staff physician at a major tertiary care children's hospital. This fellowship is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME).

The fellow will have exposure to a wide range of disorders that are encountered in clinical practice, and a large volume of experience will involve the management of middle ear disorders and airway problems. In addition, the fellow will gain experience in diagnosis and management of children with disorders of the paranasal sinuses, congenital abnormalities of the head and neck, craniofacial anomalies, hearing impairment and tumors of the head and neck.

The fellow will gain experience in otologic surgery consisting of tympanoplasty, mastoidectomy, ossicular reconstruction, repair of aural atresia and repair of perilymph fistula.

Experience in endoscopy will include flexible and rigid laryngoscopy, suspension microlaryngoscopy, surgery with the carbon dioxide and KTP laser, bronchoscopy, removal of foreign bodies from upper aerodigestive tract, nasal endoscopy and endoscopic sinus surgery as well as surgical management of complications of acute sinusitis.

Experience in head and neck surgery will include repair of laryngotracheal stenosis, excision of benign and malignant masses in the head and neck, excision of thyroglossal duct and branchial cleft anomalies.

There is an educational relationship with the department of plastic surgery which allows the pediatric otolaryngology fellow to assist and operate with the division chief on many of the patients encountered by the fellow in the craniofacial clinic. The surgical procedures include cleft lip and palate repair, pharyngeal flap and sphincteroplasty, craniofacial reconstruction, auricular reconstruction and cosmetic procedures such as otoplasty, rhinoplasty and mandibular advancement.

The fellow will attend a series of lectures given by the members of the full time and voluntary medical staff at Children's National Health System. These lectures will be planned in order to provide the fellow with basic science and clinical information pertaining to pediatric otolaryngology.

Pediatric otolaryngology fellowship at the Children's National was established in 1984 and has graduated more than 33 fellows. Many of the graduates have pursued academic careers and are recognized leaders in the field of pediatric otolaryngology.

The goal of the training program is to provide solid foundation in all aspects of pediatric otolaryngology clinical care and research, and prepare the fellow for an academic career. Teaching experience is also provided through exposure to otolaryngology residents, medical students and other specialty trainees.

Research

Research

Each fellow is assigned an office space with a dedicated computer and with internet access via DS3 connection. Children's National offers access to MEDLINE searches and full-text articles on OVID and MD Consult databases. The library has 12 computers and 2 medical librarians to help with literature searches and retrieval of articles, including the use of interlibrary loans. Pediatric otolaryngology fellows also have access to the George Washington University School of Medicine library.

The pediatric otolaryngology fellows participate actively in clinical research, often as the principal investigator. They submit the IRB protocol, carry out the data collection and analyses, and write the manuscript under the supervision of the attending faculty. Due to constraints of the one-year fellowship program there is no protected time for basic science research rotations, and, as such, the fellows in the have not actively participated in basic science research.

Fellows however have been productive in clinical research. In the past 5 years there have been over a dozen presentations by fellows at national meetings, and 10 publications led by fellows in national peer-reviewed journals. There is extensive extramural and intramural grant funding within the department, including two active R21 grants from the NIH, and one active grant from the Flight Attendants Medical Research Initiative. These grant account for account for approximately $750K for extramural research support to the division.

Education

Education

We offer one year pediatric otolaryngology fellowship program at the Children's National Health System with training in all aspects of pediatric otolaryngology which will prepare the fellow for a career in academic medicine with an appointment as a staff physician at a major tertiary care children's hospital. This fellowship is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME).The fellow will have exposure to a wide range of disorders that are encountered in clinical practice, and a large volume of experience will involve the management of middle ear disorders and airway problems. In addition, the fellow will gain experience in diagnosis and management of children with disorders of the paranasal sinuses, congenital abnormalities of the head and neck, craniofacial anomalies, hearing impairment and tumors of the head and neck.

The fellow will gain experience in otologic surgery consisting of tympanoplasty, mastoidectomy, ossicular reconstruction, repair of aural atresia and repair of perilymph fistula. Experience in endoscopy will include flexible and rigid laryngoscopy, suspension microlaryngoscopy, surgery with the carbon dioxide and KTP laser, bronchoscopy, removal of foreign bodies from upper aerodigestive tract, nasal endoscopy and endoscopic sinus surgery as well as surgical management of complications of acute sinusitis. Experience in head and neck surgery will include repair of laryngotracheal stenosis, excision of benign and malignant masses in the head and neck, excision of thyroglossal duct and branchial cleft anomalies.

There is an educational relationship with the department of plastic surgery which allows the pediatric otolaryngology fellow to assist and operate with the division chief on many of the patients encountered by the fellow in the craniofacial clinic. The surgical procedures include cleft lip and palate repair, pharyngeal flap and sphincteroplasty, craniofacial reconstruction, auricular reconstruction and cosmetic procedures such as otoplasty, rhinoplasty and mandibular advancement. The fellow will attend a series of lectures given by the members of the full time and voluntary medical staff at Children's National. These lectures will be planned in order to provide the fellow with basic science and clinical information pertaining to pediatric otolaryngology.

Pediatric otolaryngology fellowship at the Children's National was established in 1984 and has graduated more than 33 fellows. Many of the graduates have pursued academic careers and are recognized leaders in the field of pediatric otolaryngology. The goal of the training program is to provide solid foundation in all aspects of pediatric otolaryngology clinical care and research, and prepare the fellow for an academic career. Teaching experience is also provided through exposure to otolaryngology residents, medical students and other specialty trainees. Pediatric otolaryngology department has over 13,000 patient encounters each year (includes outpatient and inpatient visits). Yearly 4,500 operative cases are performed. Wide exposure to routine and complicated otologic, airway, sinus and head and neck procedures. Craniofacial, hearing impairment, cochlear implant, swallowing and oromotor disorders, airway and voice clinics are offered in conjunction with other disciplines. Core curriculum course is offered weekly. Fellows participate in monthly journal club, weekly grand rounds, monthly morbidity and mortality conferences and radiology/pathology conferences.

Case Load

Pediatric otolaryngology department has over 13,000 patient encounters each year (includes outpatient and inpatient visits). Yearly 4,500 operative cases are performed.

Operative Experience

Wide exposure to routine and complicated otologic, airway, sinus and head and neck procedures.

Specialty Clinics

Craniofacial, hearing impairment, cochlear implant, swallowing and oromotor disorders, airway and voice clinics are offered in conjunction with other disciplines.

Conferences/Didactics

Core curriculum course is offered weekly. Fellows participate in monthly journal club, weekly grand rounds, monthly morbidity and mortality conferences and radiology/pathology conferences.

How to Apply

How to Apply

The program participates in the Pediatric Otolaryngology Match program through SF Match.

Applications are accepted from November 15 - February 15.

  • Duration of fellowship: 1 year with an option of a 2nd year of research
  • Number of fellows per year: Two
  • Accreditation: Accredited by ACGME 
  • University Affiliation: George Washington University School of Medicine
  • Eligibility: Individuals must have completed an ACGME or Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada accredited Otolaryngology residency and are eligible or certified by the American Board of Otolaryngology. District of Columbia license is also required.

The interview dates are set in the fall through the American Society of Pediatric Otolaryngology Fellowship Committee. This year we will be interviewing March 12 and March 13.

Applications should be directed to the Fellowship Program Director. We use the universal application form.

Additionally, the applicant needs to register in the SF Match.

Other Requirements: Three letters of recommendation, curriculum vitae, personal statement.

Faculty and Staff

Faculty and Staff

Attending Physicians

George H Zalzal, MD - Division Chief
Nancy Bauman, MD
Joshua R Bedwell, MD
Maria T Pena, MD
Diego A Preciado, MD, PhD
Brian K Reilly, MD
Rahul K Shah, MD

Physician Assistants

Sherwood Holloway, PA
Michelle Levy, PA
Jonathan Lively, PA

Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: What is the didactic component of the fellowship program?

We have a comprehensive educational didactic program in the fellowship year. The didactic lectures take place on 2nd, 3rd and 4th Thursdays (7:30am) of each month. The topics for these lectures were formalized in July of 2007 and contain topics proposed in the curriculum for pediatric otolaryngology as defined by the American Board of Otolaryngology. These topics were also agreed to be topics essential to the training of subspecialty residents (fellows) by the Education Committee of the American Society of Pediatric Otolaryngology (ASPO). Other educational activities include radiology conference (1st Thurs, 7:30 am); journal club (4th Tues, 5:00 pm); case management conference (4th Tues, 6:00 pm); morbidity and mortality conference (3rd Wed, 5:00pm); cochlear implant team meeting (1st Wed, 11:30 am); craniofacial team meeting (every Tues., 4:30 pm); airway team meeting (3rd Tues, 1:00 pm), and pathology conference (one quarterly Thurs. 7:30 am).

Q: What is the role of the fellows in teaching medical students?

The pediatric otolaryngology fellow has primary responsibility for educating medical students from GWU School of Medicine rotating through the pediatric otolaryngology service both in the clinic and operating room setting. He/she assigns the medical students day-to-day to either clinic or operating room attendance, to patients on the ward, and to guided reading during the rotation. He/she participates in medical student evaluations. Finally, he/she assists and guides the students in preparing a 15-minute presentation on an interesting patient related topic, which is given by the student either at the 3rd Wednesday Case Conference or before the 4th Tuesday Journal Club.

Q: What are the call responsibilities for the fellows?

Pediatric otolaryngology fellows are assigned to be on-call from home every fourth night for six months (when there are two rotating general ENT residents). Additionally, the fellows back-up the residents on overnight call for the first two months of the fellowship. A call room is available. The pediatric otolaryngology fellow leads the morning and evening rounds, clinics, and specialty clinics and has the added roles of teaching the otolaryngology resident and serving as the leader of the team that includes two to three residents, medical students and physician’s assistants because of his seniority and expected advanced knowledge in pediatric otolaryngology. The team is responsible for the care of inpatients on the otolaryngology service, for providing consults to other services and the emergency room, for managing the care of outpatients in the otolaryngology clinics and for assisting in the operative care of all patients. Bi-weekly, on a rotating basis, the fellows are assigned to be either primary operating room (OR) or clinic fellow. The OR fellow is expected to cover the OR cases, especially those cases that are identified as index cases for pediatric otolaryngology, and serve as the ‘chief fellow’ for the inpatient service. The primary daytime responsibility for the assigned clinic fellow is to coordinate care of outpatient clinics and learn outpatient management of pediatric otolaryngology disorders. The clinic fellow also plays an active role in assisting the ‘chief’ fellow with the general day-to-day rounding/management of the inpatient service. On occasions where there is more than one pediatric ENT index case occurring in the OR at the same time, the clinic fellow may be released from the clinic to go up to the OR.

Q: Is moonlighting allowed?

Moonlighting is not currently allowed.

Q: What are the benefits?

  • Health, Dental, Vision
  • Flexible Spending Accounts
  • Life Insurance
  • Annual & Sick Leave
  • Disability Insurance
  • Employee Assistance Program
  • Backup Child and Elder Care
A detailed summary of all benefits can be found in our Benefits Guide.

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