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Latest News

Urea Cycle Disorders Consortium Foresees Innovation from Major NIH Funding

Children’s National Health System’s  Urea Cycle Disorders Consortium was awarded $6.25 million over the next five years in the latest round of funding  from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to perform clinical research and develop new treatments for patients with urea cycle disorders (UCD), rare but devastating genetic conditions.

Children’s National Physician Looks at Effects of Energy Drinks and Caffeine Consumption on Sleep, Mood, and Performance in Children

Pediatrician and sleep medicine specialist at Children’s National Health System, Judith Owens, MD, says despite increased consumption of energy drinks, there remain knowledge gaps on the health impacts of caffeine on the adolescent and young adult population. Dr. Owens led a review of the effects of caffeinated products on sleep, mood, and performance in children and adolescents in a special supplement to the journal Nutrition Reviews.

Children's National Researchers Uncover Therapeutic Target Linked to Sepsis

Yang Liu, PhD, Director and Bosworth Chair of the Cancer Biology Center for Cancer and Immunology Research at Children’s National Health System, and his colleagues Pan Zheng, MD,  McKnew Professor of Cancer Biology, and Guo-Yun Chen, PhD,  Assistant Professor of Immunology , have uncovered a “promising new therapeutic  target” in an experimental model of sepsis in mice that could open the door for improved treatment of inflammation linked to sepsis.