Roberta DeBiasi, MD Division Chief, Infectious Disease



Roberta DeBiasi, MD, is a pediatric infectious disease specialist. After ten years in Colorado, she relocated to the DC area in 2006. Dr. DeBiasi’s research interests include the pathogenesis of serious viral infections such as myocarditis and encephalitis (infection of the heart and brain), and the development of novel treatments. For her research contributions, she was awarded the Infectious Diseases Society of America Young Investigator Award, and is currently funded by the NIH National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease.

Her clinical expertise and interests focus on infections of the central nervous system and heart, as well as emerging viral infectious diseases. She is the author of a multitude of original research and review articles, as well as textbook chapters in the realm of infectious diseases. She is actively involved in the education and mentoring of graduate students, residents, infectious disease fellows, and community physicians. She enjoys exploring the outdoors and fine arts with her husband and two young children.

Education & Training

Education & Training

  • Fellowship Program, Pediatric Infectious Diseases, 1999
    University of Colorado Health Science Center
  • Residency Program, Pediatrics, 1995
    University of California-Davis Medical Center
  • Internship Program, Pediatrics, 1993
    University of California-Davis Medical Center
  • MD, 1992
    University of Virginia School of Medicine
  • BA, 1988
    Boston University
Patient Stories

Patient Stories: Roberta DeBiasi

Patient story

Emily's Story

"The social worker was great. She held a class for Emily and the other needle phobic kids on the floor. This class allowed the kids to place IV's in stuffed dolls and have some control over the care of someone else, even if it was just a doll."

Patient story

Cameron's Story

"I hope this letter gives hope to other parents that may be in this same situation. Early diagnosis is the key."



Children's National Ebola Response Task Force Publishes Report on Preparedness and Response Plan

When the 2014 Ebola virus outbreak erupted internationally with a threat to spread to the U.S, Children’s National Health System faced the crisis by creating an innovative multidisciplinary Ebola Response Task Force that developed, implemented, and refined plans ranging from education, screening, transporting, monitoring, isolating and caring for patients, to logistics, communications, and advocacy.

Study Shows Medication Can Improve Hearing for Children with Viral Infection

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Collaborative Antiviral Study Group has found that treatment with the anti-viral medication valganciclovir for six months improves hearing and developmental outcomes over a two-year period for infants with congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection.  Roberta L. DeBiasi, MD, MS, Chief of the Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Children's National Health System, is co-author of the study published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Research & Publications

Research & Publications

Cardiac cellspecific apoptotic and cytokine responses to reovirus infection Determinants of myocarditic phenotype

(2009) Journal of Cardiac Failure

Neuronal apoptosis in human Herpes Simplex virus and Cytomegalovirus encephalitis

(2002) Journal of Infectious Diseases.

West Nile virus meningoencephalitis

(2006) Nature Clinical Practice Neurology.

View publications on PubMed

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Blair's Story

Patient story

"I was blown away by the personalized care that we received. The nurses are incredibly compassionate and kind, and really made every effort to make the journey less painful for everyone."

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