Brian Rood, MD Neuro-Oncologist

Bio

Biography

Brian R. Rood, MD, is an Associate Professor of Pediatrics in the Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders at Children’s National Health System whose primary clinical focus is pediatric neuro-oncology. Dr. Rood joined the faculty of Children’s National in 2002 after completing a fellowship in Pediatric Hematology/Oncology as well as a research fellowship in the molecular biology of brain tumors, both at Children’s National and Children’s Research Institute.

Dr. Rood is the Director of Clinical Neuro-Oncology at Children’s and cares for brain tumor patients on the inpatient oncology ward and in the outpatient clinic. He is co-principal investigator with Roger Packer, MD, of the Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium clinical trial program at Children’s National and runs an active molecular biology lab in the Center for Cancer and Immunology Research. He also is investigating the proteome of medulloblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumor of childhood, in order to determine the differences between the four subgroups of the disease in an effort to identify therapeutic targets. He aims to further this work by identifying medulloblastoma specific proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid in order to discover biomarkers capable of providing insight into the biology of brain tumors and detecting recurrent disease. Dr. Rood also is working to identify microsatellite markers in a person’s DNA that predict the risk of developing different kinds of brain tumors.

Dr. Rood has two children. His favorite past times include designing and building furniture, sailing, reading, and playing the mandolin.

Education & Training

Education & Training

  • Fellowship Program, Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, 2002
    Children's National Medical Center
  • Fellowship Program, Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, 2001
    Children's National Medical Center
  • Residency Program, Pediatrics, 1998
    University of Vermont
  • MD, Medicine, 1995
    Jefferson Medical College
  • BA, English Literature, 1991
    Pennsylvania State University
Patient Stories

Patient Stories: Brian Rood

Patient story

Elias's Story Part Three

"As a parent of young children, you know that kids will do the darndest things. So do the best you can, keep your eyes open, but don't beat yourself up if you have to get a new broviac."

Patient story

Elias's Story Part Two

"One positive thing I have to say about this process is that the rotation of Children's attending physicians for the oncology inpatient unit is outstanding, and the fellows also are very good. They were accessible (by phone, too, when we were at home), understanding, and of course knowledgeable."

Patient story

Mason's Story

"You are about to embark on a journey that will be the challenge of your life as a parent. But you have chosen a hospital and a brain tumor treatment team that is one of the best in the country."

Keith's Story

"You will find new strength you didn't know you had. You will find that what seemed to be the daily grind of work or home life will take on new meaning and will sustain you by the sheer normalness of it."

Patient story

Kayla's Story

"If we had not come to Children's National for a second opinion, our daughter might not be alive today."

Patient story

Elias's Story

"No matter whom we saw on any day, we always felt Eli had a roomful of experts behind him."

Isabel's Story

As a pediatric nurse at Children's National, I never imagined that my child would be sick.

News

News

Research & Publications

Research & Publications

Somatic Intronic Microsatellite Loci Differentiate Glioblastoma from Lower-Grade Gliomas

(2014) Oncotarget

Deciphering HIC1 control pathways to reveal new avenues in cancer therapeutics 

(2013) Expert Opinion on Therapeutic Targets

Durable response of intracranial cellular hemangioma to bevacizumab and temozolomide

(2013) Journal of Neurosurgery Pediatrics

Proteomic Profiling of Cerebrospinal Fluid Identifies Prostaglandi D2 Synthase as a Putative Biomarker for Pediatric Medulloblastoma: A Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium Study

(2011) Proteomics

Scavenger chemokine (CXC motif) receptor 7 (CXCR7) is a direct target gene of HIC1

(2009) Journal of Biological Chemistry

View publications on PubMed

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Staci's Story

Patient story

"As a parent/caretaker, you want to fight with every ounce of fight that you have. It's normal and necessary to help you feel like you are fighting right along with your precious baby."

Read More of Staci's Story

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