Nosebleeds

Nosebleeds can be a scary occurrence, but are usually not dangerous. The medical term for nosebleed is epistaxis. They are fairly common in children, especially in dry climates or during the winter months when dry heat inside homes and buildings can cause drying, cracking, or crusting inside the nose. Many times, children outgrow the tendency for nosebleeds during their teenage years.

The front part of the nose contains many fragile blood vessels that can be damaged easily. Most nosebleeds in children occur in the front part of the nose close to the nostrils.

Prevention & Risk Treatment

Prevention & Risk Treatment

What causes a nosebleed?

Nosebleeds are caused by many factors, but some of the most common causes include the following:

  • Picking the nose
  • Blowing the nose too hard
  • Injury to the nose
  • Over-dry air
  • Colds and allergies
  • Foreign body in the nose
  • Many times no apparent cause for a nosebleed can be found.

Prevention of nosebleeds

If your child has frequent nosebleeds, some general guidelines to help prevent nosebleeds from occurring include the following:

  • Use a cool mist humidifier in your child's room at night if the air in your home is dry. Be sure to follow the manufacturer's advice for cleaning the humidifier so that germs and mold do not grow in it.
  • Teach your child not to pick his or her nose or blow it too forcefully.
  • Apply petroleum jelly inside the nostrils several times a day, especially at bedtime, to help keep the area moist.
  • Use saline (salt water) drops or a saline nose spray, as directed by your child's physician.

See your child's physician for treatment of allergies that may contribute to frequent nosebleeds.

Children's Team

Children's Team

Providers

zalzal

George Zalzal

Division Chief, Ear, Nose, and Throat (Otolaryngology)
Departments

Departments

Ear, Nose and Throat (Otolaryngology)

Our pediatric ENT (otolaryngology) experts provide advanced, comprehensive services for children.

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