Foreign Bodies in the Ear, Nose, and Airway

Foreign bodies in the ear, nose, and breathing tract (airway) sometimes occur in children. Foreign bodies refer to any object that is placed in the ear, nose, or mouth that is not meant to be there and could cause harm without immediate medical attention.

Foreign bodies in the ear

Foreign bodies can either be in the ear lobe or in the ear canal. Objects usually found in the ear lobe are earrings, either stuck in the lobe from infection or placed too deep during insertion. Foreign bodies in the ear canal can be anything a child can push into his or her ear. Some of the items that are commonly found in the ear canal include the following:

  • Food
  • Insects
  • Toys
  • Buttons
  • Pieces of crayon
  • Small batteries

It is important for parents to be aware that children may cause themselves or other children great harm by placing objects in the ear.

The reason children place things in their ears is usually because they are bored, curious, or copying other children. Sometimes, one child may put an object in another child's ear during play. Insects may also fly into the ear canal, causing potential harm. It has also been noted that children with chronic outer ear infections tend to place things in their ears more often.

Foreign bodies in the nose

Objects that are put into the child's nose are usually soft things. These would include, but are not limited to, tissue, clay, and pieces of toys, or erasers. Sometimes, a foreign body may enter the nose while the child is trying to smell the object. Children often place objects in their noses because they are bored, curious, or copying other children.

Foreign bodies in the airway

A foreign body in the airway (choking) constitutes a medical emergency and requires immediate attention. The foreign body can get stuck in many different places within the airway. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, death by choking is a leading cause of death and injury among children younger than 4 years of age. 

As with other foreign body problems, children tend to put things into their mouths when they are bored or curious. The child may then inhale deeply and the object may become lodged in the "airway" tube (trachea) instead of the "eating" tube (esophagus). Food may be the cause of obstruction in children who do not have a full set of teeth to chew completely, or those children who simply do not chew their food well. Children also do not have complete coordination of the mouth and tongue which may also lead to problems. Children under the age of four years are in the greatest danger of choking on small objects, including, but not limited to, the following:

  • Seeds
  • Toy parts
  • Grapes
  • Hot dogs
  • Pebbles
  • Nuts
  • Buttons
  • Coins

Children need to be watched very closely to avoid a choking emergency.

Prevention & Risk Treatment

Prevention & Risk Treatment

What are the symptoms of foreign bodies in the ear?

Some objects placed in the ear may not cause symptoms, while other objects, such as food and insects, may cause pain in the ear, redness, or drainage. Hearing may be affected if the object is blocking the ear canal.

What are the symptoms of foreign bodies in the nose?

The most common symptom of a foreign body in the nose is nasal drainage. The drainage appears only on the side of the nose with the object and often has a bad odor. In some cases, the child may also have a bloody nose.

What are the symptoms of foreign bodies in the airway?

Foreign body ingestion requires immediate medical attention. The following are the most common symptoms that may indicate a child is choking. However, each child may experience symptoms differently. Symptoms may include:

  • Choking or gagging when the object is first inhaled
  • Coughing at first
  • Wheezing (a whistling sound, usually made when the child breathes out)

Although the initial symptoms listed above may subside, the foreign body may still be obstructing the airway. The following symptoms may indicate that the foreign body is still causing an airway obstruction:

  • Stridor (a high-pitched sound usually heard when the child breathes)
  • Cough that gets worse
  • Child is unable to speak
  • Pain in the throat area or chest
  • Hoarse voice
  • Blueness around the lips
  • Not breathing
  • The child may become unconscious
Children's Team

Children's Team

Providers

zalzal

George Zalzal

Division Chief, Ear, Nose, and Throat (Otolaryngology)
Departments

Departments

Ear, Nose and Throat (Otolaryngology)

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